Saturday, 18 July 2015

Install CDBurnerXP without the OpenCandy installer

Everybody loves free software, in fact everybody loves anything that's free, and let's face it, there isn't much in life that is free.
So when a good piece of software comes along that is free, you will want it right?
This leaves somebody out there, sitting for hours on end, programming a program, and that person will need to make a living somehow.

They could just program in their spare time for fun, knowing that people will get enjoyment from what they do.
They could try to make money from it, which in turn will make them even keener to produce something that people really want to keep using.
or
They could try to make a living from writing the program, which really could make it the most amazing thing that you want to keep using.

How do they then make money, if everybody wants the software for free?
They could have ads on their site, but this would only make them money when people return to their site to get the latest version.
They could plaster the actual program with ads, so you see them as you are using the program. This would get extremely irritating.
or
They could bundle another software item in with their program, such as a PUP (Potentially Unwanted Program). This would allow them to get paid by the other software creator

Tuesday, 7 July 2015

Restoring to a saved System Restore point

As is stated in the Delete System Restore points and Shadow Copies and the Manually create a System Restore point posts, System Restore plays a vital role in enabling you to return your computer to a previous moment in time.
This tutorial will run through the procedure that is required to restore your computer to an earlier moment in time.
To start the procedure of restoring your computer to a previously saved System Restore point, click the Start button, go to All Programs, then Accessories, then System Tools, then finally click System Restore. You will now have the window below showing.
On this window click the Next button.

Sunday, 5 July 2015

Manually create a System Restore point

As is stated in the Delete System Restore points and Shadow Copies post, System Restore plays a vital role in enabling you to return your computer to a previous moment in time. You might therefore want to create manual System Restore points from time to time.
For instance, if you have been badly infected and spent ages getting your computer clean again, then its a good idea to create a new restore point, which you can name so as you will know it was the one that you created on a clean computer. You could then delete all but the last restore point, knowing that the only one you have left is the clean one, and therefore you won't restore your computer back to a bad one.
To start the procedure of creating a manual Restore point, click the Start button, go to All Programs, then Accessories, then System Tools, then finally click System Restore.

Delete System Restore points and Shadow Copies

Assuming System Restore is enabled on your computer, which hopefully it is, as it plays a vital role in enabling you to return your computer to a previous moment in time, in the event of your computer becoming problematic, then your computer could have numerous Restore points and shadow copies taking up much needed hard disk space.
System Restore points are created by the operating system automatically on a daily basis by default, when updating Windows, when installing some third party software and when installing new device drivers.
You can also create new restore points yourself if you wish.
Shadow Copies are snapshots of a system and will include previous versions of files. Shadow Copies are included within saved Restore Points. Shadow Copies can only be created on computers with the newer NTFS file system, not on older FAT32 systems.
You can take control and remove older versions of your Restore Points and Shadow Copies if you like, but you can't remove the latest one. The latest one is always left intact to aid you in restoring your computer to a working condition again if the time arises.

Ford M Serial Radio Code Generator

Do you have an M serial ford radio and you don't know the 4 digit code for it?
(The serial number can be found on the label, on the top or bottom of the radio and will start with an M if it is an M serial one)

I have one. It came pre-fitted in my current car, but I had no documentation with it, and when faced with needing a new clutch, which would of meant the battery would have to be disconnected, I was then faced with paying Ford £25 to find out my code.
So I did what seemed natural and turned to Google.
I found this neat little program called Ford M Serial Radio Code Generator, and thought it's worth a try, so I downloaded it from the link below: